Browning Buck Mark Handgun Reviews

Discussion in 'Browning Mark Handgun' started by Billythekid, Apr 2, 2011.

  1. Billythekid

    Billythekid Administrator Staff Member Administrator

    http://www.pistolguru.com/browning-buckmark.html

    Browning Buckmark Review

    As is the case with many handguns, the Browning Buckmark has many models to choose from. Although they vary in price and features, they all shoot "relatively" the same; and that is good!

    I purchased the Buckmark plus with the rosewood grips and the slab side barrel. When I bought it, the intent was not to be able to write a pistol review, it was purely a personal choice: One that I have no regrets about. Another picture and some details are available here. Ok.. Here we go....

    The Good

    Accurate: This is a pistol made for target shooting! For the price, you can't beat it. Smooth, accurate with very little muzzle flip so you can keep on your mark.

    Reliable: As is the case with most Browning firearms, this gun is top notch when it comes to reliability. Granted, I can be a little obsessive when it comes to keeping my pistols clean, but this gun has yet to jam or mis-feed. I mean "come on! It's a browning"!
    Great Feel: Now, I don't have the biggest hands in the world, but no matter what size hands you have, I think this pistol will just fit. It feels great in my hands and seems to have plenty of "room" for the bigger handed individual and it just fits really well. A comfortable, good feeling handgun will aid in your accuracy. After all, isn't that what we want?
    Looks: Subjective I know! I try and stay away from the subjective topics. What might look great to one, might look awful to another. I, however, absolutely love how this pistol looks.
    The Bad

    Price: It's no secret, you pay for the Browning name. The Browning Buckmark is no exception. With tax and everything, I paid $424.00 for mine. That's really not too bad for a pistol of this quality, but if you don't shop around and end up paying retail, you can hit $500 pretty easily.
    Ammo Sensitive?: If one is going to do handgun reviews, they have to share all the facts. This is one of those cases where I'm hesitant to share this because I TRULY don't believe this is an issue with the Browning, rather the ammunition. I have no clue how many different brands of ammunition I have fired through this gun. All of them, save one, have performed flawlessly. For some reason, the combination of "my" Browning Buckmark and the "Remington Golden Bullet .22" ammunition do not play nice together. I had no less than 3 "click no bangs" in 100 rounds of that ammo I fired through this pistol. I checked each bullet and there was a very nice strike right on the rim of the shell. I can't explain it, but I wanted to mention it.
    The Ugly

    Not a thing!
    Overall Rating

    4.5 out of 5
    Summary

    Writing handgun reviews is a blast, this pistol makes this one even more fun! If you are looking for a nice, quality, fun shooting target pistol, this is a quality choice. It is no secret Browning makes quality products but you do have to pay for that quality. I have no doubt this gun will last a lifetime with the proper care and storage. If it wasn't for the issue I had with the "Golden Bullets", this pistol would be rated a 5 out of 5. If you don't need the wooden grips and the fiber optics sights, you can pick up a Browning Buckmark for around $350(or less) before tax.
  2. Billythekid

    Billythekid Administrator Staff Member Administrator

    Re: Browning Mark Handgun Reviews

    http://firearmfun.blogspot.com/2008/09/ ... amper.html

    REVIEW: BROWNING BUCKMARK Camper Bull Barrel

    Shooting is fun. My buddy Bruce and I really enjoy our time at the range but shooting 9mm and .45 ACP on a weekly basis was really costing us a lot of money. So, we decided to spend some money now with the intent of saving money later. Our math worked like this, if shooting Winchester 9mm cost $20 per 100 at Wal-mart, $30 per 100 .45 and shooting Federal .22 cost us $13 per 550 then if we each shot about 5,000 rounds a year it would cost us $1,000 for 9mm, $1,500 for .45 but only $120 to shoot .22!

    Of those 5,000 rounds, if we shot 2,500 centerfire ($500 for 9mm) and 2,500 .22 ($60 for .22) our annual ammo cost would be $560. The cost difference bought us each a .22 cal. pistol. How's that for a great (rationalizing) reason to buy another gun?

    After handling several different .22 cal. target/hunting pistols Bruce bought the Browning Buck Mark Camper with a stainless 5.5 inch Bull Barrel. He paid a very fair $299 for it. The only things that came in the plastic storage box was the gun, one 10-round magazine and an allen wrench. Bruce quickly bought a second magazine and will more than likely buy one or two more in the future.

    The first thing immediately notice about the pistol is the weight. It feels much lighter than many other .22 sporting pistols. I would say it weighs about as much as a well made airsoft pistol. My first thought was that this will be a very easy gun to wield but it'll suffer from a bit of recoil induced muzzle motion. As these thoughts were going through my head, I also noticed that the contoured grip was very comfortable and the gun was very well balanced. It didn't feel nose heavy like many bull-barreled, rather it felt perfectly neutral in my hand.

    I loaded the two 10-round magazines and readied the gun for firing. The slide pulls back very easily and the light gun quickly goes to sights. I lined up the bright green fiber optic front sight and pulled the trigger. The shot broke with a crisp trigger that has very little travel. I kept the trigger depressed to allow the gun a natural follow-though then lessened the pressure on my trigger finger and the trigger reset with only a tiny amount of movement ready for the next shot.

    The shots from my first magazine were ill-placed and not a good indication of the gun's ability to shoot due to my concentration of the "feel" of the thing. On the second magazine, I tried to keep my shots grouped as tightly as possible. At this point in the day, our targets were out at 10 yards making it easy to shoot tight groups. Even so, I was very happy with the result with someone else's gun.

    My first impression that the light gun would allow even a .22 to have a some muzzle flip was unfounded. The well balanced gun had a small amount of flip but nothing too noticeable for a casual sporting gun. If this gun were to be used for competition, the flip would need to be tamed with some sort of compensator but for our use, it was a very easy gun to shoot.

    Fiber optic sights are very popular and getting more popular by the day and I can see why. On a sunny day it offers a very bright focal point for your eye and makes it so much easier to align the front sight between the rear sight notch quickly and accurately.

    This is obviously a pistol that can be handled by a full-grown man, woman or young child just learning to shoot. The medium-sized grip, light weight, easy sighting and light recoil make it ideal for any shooter. When I say any shooter, I mean it. If you're new to the sport this gun will help you master some of the basics and get you accustomed to handling, aiming and shooting a pistol. If you're a seasoned verteran you'll get tons of fun and trigger time for less than 3 cents a shot. That's almost as cheap as dry firing at home.

    If you're looking for a competitive target pistol, capable of shooting 1/2 inch groups at 25 yards, you'll want to graduate up to the Browning Buck Mark Bullseye Target Stainless or the
    Buck Mark Contour Lite 7.25 URX or even replace the factory barrel for a custom high performance barrel. But for most casual shooters, the Buck Mark Camper will give you hours and hours of fun pistol time and small game hunting ability without breaking the bank. With the gun starting at $299 and the .22 ammo still are reasonable prices, there's not many other options that make this much sense. Plus, if you want to add accessories, the Buck Mark Camper easily accepts an optional Weaver scope mount that will give you red dot or scoped accuracy.

    There are only two .22 pistols I would really consider if in the market for a reasonably priced, rimfire fun gun and that's the Ruger Mark III or the Browning Buck Mark. Sure the Smith and Wesson has a lock in the competitive world but at $1,000 you could buy 3 Buck Marks and have enough money left over to buy 4,000 rounds of Federal .22 LR! How's that for value?
  3. Billythekid

    Billythekid Administrator Staff Member Administrator

    Re: Browning Mark Handgun Reviews

    http://pocket-defense.com/2010/03/brown ... 22-review/

    Browning Buckmark .22 Review

    Mar.10, 2010 in Uncategorized

    It is no secret that the 22 pistol of choice for many is the Ruger MKII. A major contender for the MKII’s place of prominence though, is the Browning Buckmark. The BuckmIt is no secret that my 22 pistol of choice is the Ruger MKII. A major contender for the MKII’s place of prominence though, is the Browning Buckmark. The Buckmark is preferred by many people because it feels more like a “real” pistol. The frame is CNC machined 7075-T6 aluminum. The controls are where one would expect, and the Buckmark’s trigger is uniformly crisp. Like the Ruger, a wide variety of sights, grips and barrels are available for the Buckmark.
    Unlike the Ruger, the serial number of the Browning 22 pistol is on the lower portion of the gun, the grip frame. This is fortunate, as it allows a variety of barrels to be mail ordered without going through a FFL holder. The design of the pistol is deceptively simple. When the grips are removed, most of the action can be disassembled by hand. Detail stripping the Buckmark is a cinch. The Browning Buckmark is a boringly reliable shooter. It is as accurate as the shooter firing it, a no excuses gun. It will digest a wide variety of ammunition without a hiccup. Little features like the recessed crown make for a slick package on the Browning. There are only two things that I do not care for on the Buckmark. The first is the scallops on the bolt that contain the grasping serrations used to open the chamber. The scallops make the bolt more difficult to lock back than it has to be. The other is the wire ejector. The ejector works well enough, but I just wish there was a more substantial part for that role. All that said. I now own a Buckmark. And after putting a Trail-Lite barrel on it from Tactical Solutions, it may be the finest .22 I have ever shot. ark is preferred by many people because it feels more like a “real” pistol. The frame is CNC machined 7075-T6 aluminum. The controls are where one would expect, and the Buckmark’s trigger is uniformly crisp.
    Like the Ruger, a wide variety of sights, grips and barrels are available for the Buckmark. Unlike the Ruger, the serial number of the Browning 22 pistol is on the lower portion of the gun, the grip frame. This is fortunate, as it allows a variety of barrels to be mail ordered without going through a FFL holder. The design of the pistol is deceptively simple. When the grips are removed, most of the action can be disassembled by hand. Detail stripping the Buckmark is a cinch. The Browning Buckmark is a boringly reliable shooter. It is as accurate as the shooter firing it, a no excuses gun. It will digest a wide variety of ammunition without a hiccup. Little features like the recessed crown make for a slick package on the Browning. There are only two things that I do not care for on the Buckmark. The first is the scallops on the bolt that contain the grasping serrations used to open the chamber. The scallops make the bolt more difficult to lock back than it has to be. The other is the wire ejector. The ejector works well enough, but I just wish there was a more substantial part for that role. All that said. I now own a Buckmark. And after putting a Trail-Lite barrel on it from Tactical Solutions, it may be the finest .22 I have ever shot.
  4. Billythekid

    Billythekid Administrator Staff Member Administrator

    http://www.gunsandammo.com/content/brow ... k-mark-udx

    Browning Buck Mark UDX


    I have been addicted to Browning rimfire pistols since the time I practically gave life and limb for a Medalist with all the trimmings. Complete with fancy wood grips, a dry-firing system and a wood fore-end, it remained in my battery until I had the desire for a more versatile semiautomatic for bullseye shooting.

    Since the Buck Mark was introduced in 1985, I have seen the line change from a minor entry in the catalog to well over 20 different variations (not including the popular Buck Mark rifle in both sporter and target versions, which brings the total up to about two dozen).

    If you are looking for a well-thought-out rimfire pistol, the variations range from mild to wild in barrels, frame configurations and even a model called "Splash" that has a gold spider-webbing pattern etched on the barrel and frame. Guns with Weaver mounts for scopes, stainless barrels and a wide variety of grips are offered to fit nearly every shooter's whim or requirement.

    The latest Buck Mark to grab my attention is the UDX series of three guns that have a redesigned grip frame. Instead of the frame running straight down the rear, it now has more of a curve to it that is very similar to an arched frame on larger-caliber guns.

    I have always been a proponent of this type of styling; it helps to keep my shots higher and more true to the mark. Another important part of this redesign is the addition of finger grooves cast right in the frame and new grip panels made from rosewood, walnut or black laminate. Complete with rakish stippling patterns that are broken up by horizontal ribbons and a laser-engraved Browning logo, they are certainly the best improvement to this gun in a long time.

    Picking up the Buck Mark, one soon finds out fast that it's a natural pointer and comfortable to operate. On the left side, you'll find the slide lock (release) located behind, up and to the rear of the trigger. With the slide open, drop this lever down and the slide bolts forward. The safety is directly behind this release and is positioned perfectly within easy reach of the ball of the thumb. Up for Safe, down for Fire--it just can't get better than this. By the way, I found both of these levers positioned in such a manner that I did not have to rotate the pistol to the left to use them.

    Right behind the trigger is the .45 auto-style magazine release. It is checkered for non-slip qualities, and pushing inward sends the magazine (with the help of a spring plunger) out of the well without a nanosecond of hesitation. For the combat buffs out there, no, the magwell is not beveled, but this gun is not made for that type of shooting.

    For the safety-minded, the gun will not fire with the magazine out of the gun, nor will the slide stay back with it removed. To lock back the slide with the magazine out, it's just a simple matter of pushing up on the slide lock to hold the slide in its rearmost position.

    The trigger is gold plated and could be considered "target" width. With my trigger gauge, it broke with just a hint of slack at 4 1/2 pounds. The Pro-Target rear sight assembly is fully adjustable for windage and elevation. Then there's the Truglo fiber-optic front sight that works in concert with the well-defined and serrated rear.

    The target-style barrel is slab-sided and well within the dimensions of what could be called a bull barrel. It has a target crown, and the top is bead blasted to a matte finish to keep the sun's glare from ruining a good sight picture. Overall, the gun is well made and ranks high on my list for appearance. The flanks of the barrel are polished bright, while most of the remainder of the gun sports a matte blue finish.

    At the range, the gun proved its potential. With a variety of ammunition, the Buck Mark was a pleasure to shoot right out of the box--and accurate to boot. Charging the gun was easy, thanks to raised side panels at the rear of the slide.

    I was impressed with this new addition to the line. It's a joy to use, breaks down easy for maintenance and has a fun factor of 10.
  5. Billythekid

    Billythekid Administrator Staff Member Administrator

    Browning Buck Mark Camper UFX

    The Browning Buck Mark Camper UFX is the latest addition to the Buck Mark family. The new design gives The Buck Mark a modern/sleek style unique to any of the previous models. The ambidextrous over-molded FX ultra grip gives you a firm feeling when holding and the Buck Mark Camper UFX comes in stainless Steel or a Matte Blue Finish.

    Browning Buck Mark Camper Stainless UFX

    RECEIVER Alloy • Matte blued finish
    BARREL Stainless tapered bull 51/2" • Matte finish
    ACTION Blowback • Single-action trigger
    GRIPS Overmolded Ultragrip FX ambidextrous
    FEATURES Pro-Target™ adjustable sights

    MSRP: $419.99

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    Buck Mark Camper UFX

    RECEIVER Alloy • Matte blued finish
    BARREL Tapered bull 51⁄2" • Matte blued finish
    ACTION Blowback • Single-action trigger
    GRIPS Overmolded Ultragrip FX ambidextrous
    FEATURES Pro-Target™ adjustable sights

    MSRP: $379.99
  6. SHOOTER13

    SHOOTER13 Guest

    Thanks for posting this review Billy...I have owned a Browning Buckmark for years, and it is a quality .22 rimfire pistol.
  7. billt

    billt .22LR

    I just bought a Camper UFX. I pick it up this Tuesday!
  8. Ran

    Ran Copper BB

    I just purchased a Buck Mark last week. My daughter and I took it to the range yesterday. Great gun! We put about 150 rounds down the pipe and not a single malfunction. I also have a Mark III. They are both very good target .22s, IMO..
  9. pakettle

    pakettle Copper BB

    Browning claims you should not field strip a buckmark for cleaning whats the reason!

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