Butt pad jigs

Discussion in 'The Workbench: Builds And Modifications' started by Ranger6, Feb 28, 2022.

  1. Ranger6

    Ranger6 Administrator Staff Member Administrator Global Moderator Forum Moderator

    I guess since I requested this category I will be the first to post. I am doing a leather covered pad on the Stevens, so I thought I would get some practice on another pad. The Winchester 37 has no pad and I was using a slip on, that worked but really wanted a better pad so I ordered a pachmayr decelerator( small). As you can see this stock has had at least two different pads or someone didn’t drill the bottom hole in the correct place. These will be drilled and dowl rods glued in to make for a good repair.

    Attached Files:

  2. Ranger6

    Ranger6 Administrator Staff Member Administrator Global Moderator Forum Moderator

    I have 2 jigs. One is the Miles Gilbert and the other is the J&R. Both require the pad to be mounted to the jig before grinding. The Miles jig is well made and worked just fine. The Winchester toe angle seems to be a little steep( lack of better words) so grinding the toe was a little more difficult then I liked. That’s how we got to the J&R jig. The angles need to be set with the Miles jig with a carpenter square. There are videos of this process. The small holes are for different size pads to be bolt on.

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  3. Ranger6

    Ranger6 Administrator Staff Member Administrator Global Moderator Forum Moderator

    The J&R jig has to be mounted to the sander table. The heel(comb) and toe angle are set by sliding the lock up or down and then locking it in place. The directions state that all angles may not be achieved and get it as close as possible.

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  4. Ranger6

    Ranger6 Administrator Staff Member Administrator Global Moderator Forum Moderator

    This pad will not mount to the jig with the prior drilled holes as you can see. So just my luck I have to come up with a solution for that. I will continue this thread when that happens.

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  5. win7stw

    win7stw .30-06

    I am liking the looks of that J&R jig
    Ranger6 likes this.
  6. Ranger6

    Ranger6 Administrator Staff Member Administrator Global Moderator Forum Moderator

    I think I came up with a solution for mounting the pad to the J&R jig, but had to order some aluminum stock so I got the new hole drilled and the other holes filled with oak dowl.

    Attached Files:

  7. Ranger6

    Ranger6 Administrator Staff Member Administrator Global Moderator Forum Moderator

    Update on the J&R jig. I added a 1” adapter to the bottom of the jig. It requires some careful measurements, some drilling and tapping and the pad now mounts to the jig. I used the bolts from the Miles jig to secure the pad to make things easy. The securing bolts are 10-32. By adding the adapter it required an adjustment to the rod that attaches to the sander table. The adapter has plenty of room to add additional tapped holes for different length of pads.

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  8. Ranger6

    Ranger6 Administrator Staff Member Administrator Global Moderator Forum Moderator

    Got started on grinding the pad tonight. I will have to say that the J&R jig is the way to go minus mounting the pad. I assume the Miles Gilbert fixture was actually made by a gunsmith and the J&R fixture looked good to some engineers on paper. Either way once the pad is mounted it is much easier to use.

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  9. Ranger6

    Ranger6 Administrator Staff Member Administrator Global Moderator Forum Moderator

    I grinded the pad down to my tape line and then fitted to see if any more work was required. The fit is pretty good, with just a little more finish work

    Attached Files:

    KyBoB likes this.
  10. Ranger6

    Ranger6 Administrator Staff Member Administrator Global Moderator Forum Moderator

    Finished up the butt pad tonight. Honestly it turned out very nice, and I am pleased with the results. So as for my project and review of both jigs I will list the pro’s and con’s of each.
    Miles Gilbert
    1) Everything you need comes with the jig.
    2) Very well made
    3) setting angles is straight forward( use square)

    Con’s
    1) jig sits low on table
    2) if your toe angle is steep it’s hard to grind ( see 1)

    J&R
    1) very easy to grind all angles
    2) angles are easier to set
    3) no need for extra tools to set angles

    Con’s
    1) mounting some pads will require an adapter
    2) more expensive
    Some things I learned along the way:
    The finer sandpaper you use while grinding the less sanding marks you will have to deal with later( I used 240). Make sure you keep the pad lubed( I used WD-40, recommended by Win7stw. It works very well. You need a good light on your table. I used a clip on light, it sucked and was in the way more then not. Make sure you do it outside, black dust will be everywhere, as well as WD-40. Make sure you check fit of the pad often to check progress. Make sure the holes in your stock are good. Make sure your stock is flat and true. I checked mine with a square, I should have sanded slightly. I finish polished with 500 grit sandpaper with WD. Do not over tighten the screws in the butt-pad. You will crack the spacer attached to the pad. and what win7stw stated, do not over tighten the bolts to secure the pad. I hope this helps the next person and if anyone wants to use either jig, pay the shipping and it’s yours to use.

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Mar 10, 2022
    huskerhunt and win7stw like this.
  11. win7stw

    win7stw .30-06

    Well done. One other key to doing these well is to not smash the pad down against the holding fixture
  12. Ranger6

    Ranger6 Administrator Staff Member Administrator Global Moderator Forum Moderator

    yes sir, actually I did that initially and seen the results and backed off a little. Couple days and the marks disappeared
  13. win7stw

    win7stw .30-06

    I may have to take you up on the offer and try the J&R jig
    Ranger6 likes this.
  14. Auzzie

    Auzzie .270 WIN

    Really good informative post. This looks much better way of doing things rather than freehanding and eyeballing on a 12 “bench disc to get all the angles and blends. Bit less nerve racking too I guess.
    KyBoB likes this.

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